Animation and Illustration

Wassilly Kandinsky (1866 -1944)
‘Drawing instruction is a training towards perception, exact observation and exact presentation not of the outward appearances of an object, but of its constructive elements, its lawful forces-tensions, which can be discovered in given objects and of the logical structures of same-education toward clear observation and clear rendering of the contexts, whereby surface phenomena are an introductory step towards the three-dimensional.’

Last year the University of Ulster’s Interaction & Animation team organised ‘life drawing for animation classes’ over and above previous provision by college life models. Students with experience of life drawing will benefit from knowing how to depict the figure in gestural poses which convey movement, not just from copying photographs, as well as perspective, proportion and creating 3D images. The ability to draw from life is fundamental in Animation and Illustration, whether you wish to depict human figures or create non-human characters as life drawing explores how bodies work, move and display emotions.

Life Drawing for Animation and Illustration covers many aspects, including up close work on facial features. Here Michael Bass demonstrated quick sketches of Clare's head and face in a few short strokes

Life Drawing for Animation and Illustration covers many aspects, including up close work on facial features. Here Michael Bass demonstrated quick sketches of Clare’s head and face in a few short strokes

Life drawing for Animation sessions, with Clare as your model, are specifically tailored for those interested in, or studying, animation and illustration. Each life drawing session individually covers; short gestural poses, exercises designed specifically for animation and illustration work, and one or two longer poses. Collectively the series of Life Drawing for Animation sessions offer an in-depth coverage of such topics as:

Movement – how the body behaves when moving, how to capture this in a static drawing or in a series of drawing for later animation or illustration

Internal structures – how the body is built, looking at bone, muscles and ligaments to understand the workings of the human form

Perspective – how to create perspective in your work to create depth and structure in your characters and backgrounds. Learning how to describe your spatial surroundings and placing the figure within them.

The dreaded chair! One of the least popular, but arguably the most useful, exercises in our Life Drawing for Animation sessions is the use of the chequered podium and an upright chair, both drawn in the first third, Clare modelling nude on the chair in the second third and the last third is the same pose clothed. This exercise is a fierce piece of perspective work and especially, incredibly, useful for those working in multi-layered animation and illustration.

The dreaded chair! One of the least popular, but arguably the most useful, exercises in our Life Drawing for Animation sessions is the use of the chequered podium and an upright chair, both drawn in the first third, Clare modelling nude on the chair in the second third and the last third is the same pose clothed. This exercise is a fierce piece of perspective work and especially, incredibly, useful for those working in multi-layered animation and illustration.

 

Simplicity – to recreate a figure several times in differing positions simplifying your lines and capturing the figure in as few lines as possible

Narrative – creating a narrative through static or short movement poses. Learning how to depict emotion and felling with facial expressions and body gestures

Close up studies – concentrating on specific aspects of the human form – the eyes, the ear, hands and feet etc to hone observational skills and improve technique and rendering of detail

Clothing and Materials – identifying the flow and fall of different materials, learning how clothing and accessories sit on the body. Practice with multi varied outfit shapes, headgear, props and accessories included in Clare‘s collection of costuming. Depicting the different textures of materials, skin, hair and fur useful in both human and non human animation and illustration.

Another exercise developed in our Life Drawing for Animation sessions is the use of the 'body bag'. This exercise works on the Flour Sack principle and helps understanding of how to animate a non human subject and create expression and emotion in both animation and illustration when working with normally inanimate type objects. Drawing of Clare in bag by Beata Lukaslewicz, animator.

Another exercise developed in our Life Drawing for Animation sessions is the use of the ‘body bag’. This exercise works on the Flour Sack principle and helps understanding of how to animate a non human subject and create expression and emotion in both animation and illustration when working with normally inanimate type objects. Drawing of Clare in bag by Beata Lukaslewicz, animator.

 

As Clare is Northern Ireland’s only full-time professional model, she has introduced a training programme for aspiring life models to raise the standard of life modelling provision across Northern Ireland. From the beginning of 2013 Clare has introduced her protégées to a number of Life Drawing for Animation sessions. This gives students access to male and female models who have been trained in methods specific to animation and illustration and provides the opportunity to access clothed multi figure dioramas for larger pieces of animation and illustration.

 

If you are interested in Animation and Illustration please book your place in one of our regular Thursday night sessions at UU, or come along to a regular life drawing session, by contacting Clare