Anatomy, Medicine and Sport

Artists have long been associated with the study of anatomy through their observational drawings of both cadavers and the living human form. Most famous to the majority of people will be Da Vinci's works, including his 'Vitruvius Man'

Artists have long been associated with the study of anatomy through their observational drawings of both cadavers and the living human form. Most famous to many people will be Da Vinci’s works, including his ‘Vitruvius Man

Life drawing and the study of anatomy have gone hand in hand for hundreds of years. Life drawing is an important tool in investigating anatomy and a useful method of learning about the human body as a whole, what it looks like, how it  and how it moves. This knowledge benefits students interested in many areas of Anatomy, Medicine and Sport.

Close observation is an important aspect of life drawing and incredibly beneficial those working with the human body, studying its anatomy, working in medicine and looking at ways to improve performance on the sports field. A professional life model for years, Clare tailors each of her sessions to fully show and enhance the teaching points and specialisations, this means you can approach Clare with the areas you would like to cover, whether in anatomy, medicine or sports, and Clare can design a course or workshop to match your needs.

Clare as drawn by Brendan Ellis, former medical illustrator at the Royal Victoria Hospital in Belfast

Clare as drawn by Brendan Ellis, former medical illustrator at the Royal Victoria Hospital in Belfast

 

Medicine

Life drawing and anatomy have a long and integrated history in the study of medicine. There is much to learn from the study of medical manuals, often illustrated by artists not photographs, and of course the cadaver, however it is also vital that those considering medicine also think about the human body in it’s living breathing form.

The intense concentration, close and accurate observation and the hand-eye coordination required in life drawing are skills immediately transferable and incredibly vital to careers in surgical fields. On the front line GP’s need to be able to recognise warning in signs in a patient, sometimes from their body language and movements alone, as they enter the room and sit down. Some patients are reluctant to discuss, or indeed may be completely unaware, of some physical symptoms that might be picked up on by a knowledgeable GP with observational skills well honed in the life room. Working with a life model allows those in medicine to see a body working and moving, clothed and unclothed, and can provide a great additional diagnostic tool.

Studying Clare modelling and close observation of her body can help students of medicine and sport learn more about the anatomy of the spine. The support the spine gives to a pose, how it  flexes, moves and changes depending on the balance of the pose and the positioning of the body.

Studying Clare modelling and close observation of her body can help students of medicine and sport learn more about the anatomy of the spine. The support the spine gives to a pose, how it flexes, moves and changes depending on the balance of the pose and the positioning of the body.

Sports

For someone interested in a sports related career, life drawing may seem completely unrelated to their field, however for many of the reasons mentioned in the medicine section, life drawing can offer a useful, and indeed valuable, set of skills to the sportsman and those in support roles such as Sports Therapy.

The atmosphere in a life room is like no other; it demands concentration and careful study, even when practicing short gestural movements. The experience sharpens attention and very much demonstrates the importance of being mentally ‘in the zone’. Studying the human body, it’s joints and muscles and how it balances and moves, enhances the understanding of where strain may occur. Working with a professional life model also demonstrates how just staying still can create tension in the body and seeing how the model deals with multiple poses of varying lengths and difficulties also helps you to think about how this feeds into your sport, or the sport in which you wish to work. Seeing how a model may act after a difficult pose can also gives an insight into recognising strains and tensions when working in sports therapy related fields.

Life drawing helps us understand how the body moves, twists and bends to get into, remain in, and get out of different poses. Here Michael Bass of UU captures a small section of a series of 30 sec poses by Clare

Life drawing helps us understand how the body moves, twists and bends to get into, remain in, and get out of different poses. Here Michael Bass of UU captures a small section of a series of 30 sec poses by Clare

 

If you have an interest in Anatomy, Medicine and Sport and would like to find out more about life drawing, you can book into a beginners life drawing session, an untutored session if you have some experience, or Contact Clare for more information.